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Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 1

Dyson's new lamp will run for 37 years thanks to its amazing design

By: Anthony Garreffa | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: Jun 12, 2015 12:08 pm

We all know how incredible the minds over at Dyson are, but their new CSYS line of lamps will run for 37 years. How? The CSYS lamps use Heat Pipe technology, similar to what is used on satellites, in order to keep the eight LEDs cool.

 

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The heat is ripped away from the bulbs, and down into an aluminum heat sink that runs the entire span of the CSYS lamp's shaft. Each LED sits in a conical reflector, where it cuts down on glare, and the usual eye strain. Dyson has baked in 3 Axis Glide Motion that lets you position the CSYS vertically, horizontally, and rotationally, with a quick flick.

 

Dyson has also provided touch-based dimming, so you can adjust the brightness to your personal liking very easily. The company will be charging $649 for the CSYS, with a taller floor model to be made available for $899.

Mercedes-Benz joins Tesla Motors with its own home battery

By: Anthony Garreffa | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: Jun 10, 2015 10:09 am

Tesla isn't the only company with the home battery on the way, with Mercedes-Benz unveiling its own home battery capable of holding 2.5kWh of electricity.

 

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But, eight of these can be tethered together for a total of 20kWh, twice of the electricity that a single Powerwall from Tesla can hold. Merdeces-Benz is taking a much more modular approach to its battery thanks to the ability of hooking multiple of them together. 20kWh should be enough for most modest sized houses, with the company hoping to ship its home battery in September.

Robot revolution is happening, and some people don't seem to like it

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: Jun 9, 2015 6:30 pm

Robots are being developed and it's up to us to be prepared for them. There has been a recent call for new public policies and organizational models that will adhere to robotics, but that doesn't necessarily mean anything useful will get done.

 

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The idea that robots could one day overpower humans seems frightening, but there is a more pressing matter: robots taking jobs from human workers. It's possible robots could end up replacing half of all jobs, with some positions at greater risk than others.

 

"This is an unparalleled situation and one that I think could actually lead to all sorts of disruptions once the public starts to catch on that we are truly in the midst of technological unemployment," said Wendell Wallach, a scholar at the Yale University Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, in a statement published by Business Insider.

Continue reading 'Robot revolution is happening, and some people don't seem to like it' (full post)

Team from Korea wins $2 million DARPA robotics challenge

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: Jun 7, 2015 10:58 pm

Robotics experts from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology snagged a $2 million prize during a DARPA contest. The United States government opened up a challenge to create a mobile robot that can work in environments too hazardous for humans.

 

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Six different countries participated in the competition, with DARPA needing "the tools to effectively respond" to humanitarian disaster relief missions, DARPA official Brad Tousely told the AFP. Robots were scored on tasks that included opening a valve, breaching a wall, how they handled debris, and how it adapted to the surrounding environment.

 

The HUBO humanoid robot is 5'9" and weighs 176 pounds - it can roll on wheels while kneeling when not using bipedal mode to walk.

Continue reading 'Team from Korea wins $2 million DARPA robotics challenge' (full post)

US Air Force likes the F-35 for its electronic warfare capability

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: Jun 1, 2015 11:20 pm

The US Air Force is interested in preparing itself for the next level of warfare, and that includes possible electronic warfare needs. Instead of focusing on the EA-18G Growler and other older planes, the USAF has turned its attention to the super pricey F-35 platform from Lockheed Martin.

 

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The F-35 provides "some pretty impressive" capabilities that include jamming enemy signals and other electronic warfare tools, according to Air Combat Command Commander General Herbert Carlisle. Considering the overall price of the F-35 program, and countless delays and setbacks, it's incredible lawmakers and military officials think American taxpayers won't notice.

 

"With the limited (budget), you've got to think harder about buying brand new legacy airplanes versus the next generation as we go forward," Carlisle recently said during a press conference. Boeing wants to receive enough orders to help ensure its F/A-18E/F and EA-18G fighter manufacturing plant in St. Louis can remain open.

Some argue we're starting debate on lethal robots too late

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: Jun 1, 2015 4:50 am

Earlier in the year, the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) met to discuss the use of lethal and potentially autonomous robots on the battlefield. Researchers are careful not to urge for a worldwide ban of Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS), though urge caution - and much more research - that must be conducted by multiple nations.

 

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The argument of maintaining human control over robotics systems on the battlefield is for moral and legal reasons that robots likely couldn't perceive. However, some wonder if the argument has started too late, as there is increased research in non-human solutions conducting military operations.

 

"Almost all states who are party to the CCW agree with the need for 'meaningful human control' over the targeting and engagement decisions made by weapons," said Stuart Russell, professor of computer science at the University of California, Berkeley, in a statement published by Nature. "Unfortunately, the meaning of 'meaningful' is still to be determined."

Continue reading 'Some argue we're starting debate on lethal robots too late' (full post)

Researchers teaching robots to play a role in even more industries

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: Jun 1, 2015 4:05 am

Researchers are creating robotic technology that can help faster automate food processing, using technology that could have major long-term ramifications. Working with the FTNON food-processing equipment manufacturer, new technology could be used in chillers to help process lettuce, cabbage, and other vegetables prior to packaging.

 

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"In industry, only humans can do that at the moment," confirmed van der Linde, co-founder and CEO of Lacquey, in a statement published by the MIT Technology Review.

 

One robot can successfully manipulate a chicken, able to slice shoulder tendons before breasts and wings are cut in a processing plant. The new automated system can match the same speed as humans, and developers want to see the speed increase. Also inside of a food processing facility, the Baxter robot from Rethink Robotics are tasked with putting chicken carcasses onto a holder before they are shipped elsewhere in the plant.

Continue reading 'Researchers teaching robots to play a role in even more industries' (full post)

Developing robots able to 'interact with people naturally'

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: May 31, 2015 11:20 pm

Researchers want to develop next-generation robots able to naturally interact with humans, hoping their creations are able to intuitively act on instinct. Researchers from the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and Institute for Systems Research want to revolutionize how robots are able to function in the real-world.

 

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Ideally, it'll be possible to teach robots common sense and general awareness of their surroundings, so they can play a wider role in the human world. ARC researchers previously showed off a robot that can learn how to cook after watching YouTube culinary videos.

 

"We're trying to build the next generation of robots," said Yiannis Aloimonos, an experienced computer science professor, in a statement released by the University of Maryland. "There are robots that can interact with people naturally and do a variety of useful things."

Continue reading 'Developing robots able to 'interact with people naturally'' (full post)

Solar-powered drone Google wants to use crashes during test flight

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: May 30, 2015 3:20 pm

The Titan Aerospace Solara 50 drone that Google wants to use as a platform to help deliver Internet service to users across the world has unfortunately crashed. The US National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash which took place in New Mexico on May 1.

 

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Google purchased Titan Aerospace in 2014, and hopes the drone, which can operate at 65,000 ft. altitude, can carry up to 70 pounds of telecom equipment. Solara 50 can produce up to seven kilowatts of power using 3,000 enclosed solar cells, and features a wingspan up to 164 feet.

 

"Although our prototype plane went down during a recent test, we remain optimistic about the potential of solar-powered planes to help deliver connectivity," said Courtney Hohne, Google spokeswoman, in a statement to Bloomberg News. "Part of building a new technology is overcoming hurdles along the way."

Continue reading 'Solar-powered drone Google wants to use crashes during test flight' (full post)

The robot cheetah from MIT can now run and jump over objects

By: Michael Hatamoto | More News: Science, Space & Robotics | Posted: May 30, 2015 2:35 pm

The cheetah-inspired robot created by researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has an innovative new skill: it can successfully jump over obstacles. The robot, which can run a maximum 10 miles per hour, is becoming even more impressive ahead of the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals next month.

 

 

Researchers equipped the robot with a LiDAR system that uses laser to detect items, with the cheetah quickly creating a virtual map of its surrounding area.

 

"It's the first legged robot to be able [to] leap hurdles like this autonomously," said Sangbae Kim, MIT research team lead, in a statement. "Many other robots can move faster on wheels, or maybe jump higher, but they can't do it on their own."

Continue reading 'The robot cheetah from MIT can now run and jump over objects' (full post)

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