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Argument rages about purchasing drugs online instead of on the street

Is purchasing drugs online safer than on the streets?

By Michael Hatamoto on Jun 16, 2015 at 05:25 am CDT - 0 mins, 52 secs reading time

Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht is now serving life in prison without the possibility of parole, but the floodgates have opened: consumers want to purchase narcotics, and the Internet has provided great new opportunities. Ulbricht's legal team tried to argue that purchasing online helped reduces street-level crime - and while the argument didn't work to reduce his prison sentence - it looks like there is some truth to that.

Argument rages about purchasing drugs online instead of on the street | TweakTown.com

In a paper published last year, researchers from the University of Montreal and University of Manchester said the wholesale/broker market is safer and should help reduce violence, intimidation and other issues related with street-level narcotics sales.

In a similar fashion to eBay, Amazon and others, these online drug websites allow sellers to rate the goods they purchased - and that could help prevent contamination of weird substances being used to cut drugs.

Online consumers feel purchasing online instead of on the street helps reduce possible physical violence, threats to safety, contaminated products, and being caught by law enforcement, according to the survey.

Last updated: Sep 1, 2017 at 06:01 am CDT

Michael Hatamoto

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Michael Hatamoto

An experienced tech journalist and marketing specialist, Michael joins TweakTown looking to cover everything from consumer electronics to enterprise cloud technology. A former Staff Writer at DailyTech, Michael is now the West Coast News Editor and will contribute news stories on a daily basis. In addition to contributing here, Michael also runs his own tech blog, AlamedaTech.com, while he looks to remain busy in the tech world.

NEWS SOURCE:washingtonpost.com

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