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Australian politician speaks positively of autonomous vehicle tech

Growing number of politicians across the world taking notice of autonomous vehicles

By Michael Hatamoto on May 31, 2015 at 07:30 pm CDT - 0 mins, 53 secs reading time

Many drivers are still unsure if they want to travel in an autonomous vehicle, but a growing number of auto industry leaders and lawmakers are discussing autonomous driver safety. They promote autonomous vehicles as a safer alternative than humans behind the wheel, removing human error that contributes to auto-related incidents.

Australian politician speaks positively of autonomous vehicle tech | TweakTown.com

"As strange as it might seem to an outside observer; they are safer, a driverless car is less likely to have an accident than a drive one," said Warren Truss, Australia's Deputy Prime Minister, in a statement to Fairfax Media. "If something is about to go wrong, they stop dead. Human error is very significant in accidents, it is rare for there not be some human element."

It could be only a matter of time before an autonomous vehicle actually causes an accident, especially in a dynamic environment such as an urban driving environment, but will it still be safer than human drivers? It looks like it'll be up to automakers to convince drivers about self-driving vehicles, which could be on our roads sooner than we expect.

Last updated: Sep 1, 2017 at 06:01 am CDT

Michael Hatamoto

ABOUT THE AUTHOR - Michael Hatamoto

An experienced tech journalist and marketing specialist, Michael joins TweakTown looking to cover everything from consumer electronics to enterprise cloud technology. A former Staff Writer at DailyTech, Michael is now the West Coast News Editor and will contribute news stories on a daily basis. In addition to contributing here, Michael also runs his own tech blog, AlamedaTech.com, while he looks to remain busy in the tech world.

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